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Bangladesh: High Court asks govt why not make law for protection on rights of domestic workers

Bangladesh: High Court asks govt why not make law for protection on rights of domestic workers

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by IDWFED published Jul 02, 2014 12:00 AM
The High Court yesterday asked the government to explain in four weeks why it should not be directed to take effective steps to formulate a law to establish rights of domestic helps. The court issued the rule after Human Rights and Peace for Bangladesh filed a writ petition on June 12 saying domestic workers are deprived of their fundamental rights even after they work 15 to 16 hours a day as they are not considered labourers under the existing laws.

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BANGLADESH -

The High Court yesterday asked the government to explain in four weeks why it should not be directed to take effective steps to formulate a law to establish rights of domestic workers.

The court issued the rule after Human Rights and Peace for Bangladesh filed a writ petition on June 12 saying domestic workers are deprived of their fundamental rights even after they work 15 to 16 hours a day as they are not considered labourers under the existing laws.

In the rule, the HC also asked the government to show cause as to why its inaction to execute policies regarding the security and rights of domestic helps should not be declared illegal.

Secretaries to the cabinet division, the Prime Minister's Office, and ministries of law, labour and child affair have been made respondents.  

During hearing yesterday, petitioner's counsel Manzill Murshid told the court that there are lakhs of domestic helps in the country, but their fundamental and human rights are not protected since they are not considered labourers in the existing laws.

Deputy Attorney General Mokhlesur Rahman represented the government.

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Source: The Daily Star

Story Type: News

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