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Trafficking in domestic work: Looking at the demand-side

Trafficking in domestic work: Looking at the demand-side

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by IDWFED published Mar 31, 2016 12:00 AM
Contributors: Alexandra Ricard-Guay
This fifth DemandAT working paper aims to provide a framework for research that captures some of the specificities of work in a domestic setting. This will provide common ground for the series of country studies that are to follow.

Resource Type

Research reports, working paper

Details

Domestic work is a sector of the economy particularly vulnerable to abusive and exploitative practices and is an area thought to be at high risk of hidden trafficking in human beings.

Yet trafficking in domestic work remains poorly defined and the multiple drivers of demand in this context are difficult to differentiate. 

This fifth DemandAT working paper aims to provide a framework for research that captures some of the specificities of work in a domestic setting. This will provide common ground for the series of country studies that are to follow.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1.  Domestic work: definition and background

1.1 Definition and terminology

1.2 Increasing demand for domestic workers and pervasive ‘deficit of decent working conditions’

1.3 A  work sector unlike any other and its vulnerability to exploitation
  1.3.1 The relationships employer/employee
  1.3.2 The private household as a workplace
  1.3.3 State policies and regulations: the intersection of migration, labour and welfare regimes
  1.3.4 Vulnerabilities associated with labour migration
  1.3.5 Child labour, domestic work and child trafficking

1.4 From vulnerability to trafficking

2. Trafficking in human beings in domestic work

2.1 International definition of trafficking in human beings and its related notion
  2.1.1 International agreed upon definition of THB
  2.1.2 Forced labour, slavery and domestic servitude
  2.1.3 European Court of Human Rights’ rulings in the interpretation of servitude, slavery and trafficking
  2.1.4 National laws

2.2 Beyond legal definitions: exploitation as a continuum

2.3 Conditions and realities of THB in domestic work
   2.3.1 Recruitment and trafficking process
   2.3.2 Working and living conditions and violation of human dignity

3.  Case law regarding THB for labour exploitation

3.1 Legal options

3.2 Challenges in prosecuting cases of THB in domestic work

4.  Demand-side of THB in domestic work

4.1 Definition: demand from whom and for what?

4.2 Specificities of domestic work when addressing demand

5. Working definition and framework

   5.1 Working definition of THB in domestic work

   5.2 Case law review: key dimensions

   5.3 Demand-side of THB in domestic work
 
References

Contents

URL

http://www.demandat.eu/publications/alexandra-ricard-guay-trafficking-domestic-work-looking-demand-side
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