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The introduction of a minimum wage for domestic workers in South Africa

The introduction of a minimum wage for domestic workers in South Africa

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by IDWFED published Mar 31, 2016 12:00 AM
Contributors: Debbie Budlender/ILO
In South Africa, the minimum wage for domestic workers was one of a large range of reforms that were undertaken in the years following the transition from Apartheid to democracy in 1994. The paper therefore starts with a brief discussion of the overall socio-political background and developments, including the developments in terms of labour legislation.

Resource Type

Research reports, working paper

Details

Conditions of Work and Employment Series No. 72

The introduction of a minimum wage for domestic workers in South Africa

  • In South Africa, the minimum wage for domestic workers was one of a large range of reforms that were undertaken in the years following the transition from Apartheid to democracy in 1994. The minimum wage was also only one element of the reforms introduced for domestic workers specifically.
  • The paper therefore starts with a brief discussion of the overall socio-political background and developments, including the developments in terms of labour legislation. It also discusses in somewhat more detail the other reforms for domestic workers beyond that of the minimum wage.

Table of contents

Introduction

1. Background: Setting the scene
1.1. South Africa in the 1990s and early 2000s
1.2. Wage setting mechanisms in South Africa
1.3. Sectoral determinations
1.4. Profile of domestic workers
1.5. Organisation of domestic workers

2. The process of setting a minimum wage for domestic workers in South Africa
2.1. Getting the process started
2.2. The investigation phase
2.2.1. Workshops
2.2.2. Research
2.2.3. Public hearings
2.3. The consultative document
2.4. Changes in the determination during the Commission process
2.4.1. Demarcation of areas
2.4.2. Working hours
2.4.3. Sick leave
2.4.4. Deductions
2.4.5. Severance pay
2.4.6. Definition and scope

3. Developments since the 2002 determination
3.1. Implementation of the determination
3.2. Minimum wages and conditions
3.3. Compliance
3.4. Employment
3.5. The 2011 determination-setting process
3.6. The Unemployment Insurance Fund
3.7. The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA)

4. Reflections on achievements and the way forward
4.1. Views on what was achieved
4.2. Unfinished business
4.2.1. Provident fund
4.2.2. Skills development and recognition
4.3. Bargaining council
4.4. Placement agency

Conclusion
Appendix: Matrix
References
Interviews
Conditions of Work and Employment Series
Conditions of work and employment series No. 72 iv

Contents

URL

http://www.ilo.org/travail/whatwedo/publications/WCMS_465069/lang--en/index.htm
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