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Mexico: Evaluation for Unpaid Work Home International Day

Mexico: Evaluation for Unpaid Work Home International Day

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by IDWFED published Jul 22, 2014 03:05 PM
Contributors: Centro de Apoyo y Capacitación para Empleadas del Hogar (CACEH)
2014 July 22, Under the International Domestic Workers Day, commemorated every July 22, the Centre for Support and Training for Household Employees (CACEH) called to assess this activity, social and public policy, since only in this way "the work of those engaged in paid domestic work is valued."
  • Mexico: Evaluation for Unpaid Work Home International Day
  • 2014-07-22T00:00:00+00:00
  • 2014-07-22T23:59:59+00:00
  • 2014 July 22, Under the International Domestic Workers Day, commemorated every July 22, the Centre for Support and Training for Household Employees (CACEH) called to assess this activity, social and public policy, since only in this way "the work of those engaged in paid domestic work is valued."
When
Jul 22, 2014 (UTC / UTC0)
Where
Mexico
Contact Name
CACEH
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MEXICO -

Evaluation for unpaid work home International Day July 22

Under the International Domestic Workers Day, commemorated every July 22, the Centre for Support and Training for Household Employees (CACEH) called to assess this activity, social and public policy, since only in this way "the work of those engaged in paid domestic work is valued."

The commemoration of this day was established in 1983 during the Second Feminist Encuentro for Latin America and the Caribbean, held in Peru, with the aim of recognizing the contribution of women in households, which are often ignored.

The points discussed were: How do domestic work affects all aspects of women's lives and the opportunity to participate in the public sphere? and how the "domestic role" of women is evident in the work outside the home?

What is domestic work?

Domestic work is unpaid activities carried out within the home to provide comfort to the family, ensure hygiene, food, and even take care of the health of its members.

The lack of recognition of this work has a negative impact on the situation of domestic workers who do it for pay.

Marcelina Bautista, president of the civic association CACEH said that for the labor rights of domestic workers must be respected claim this occupation, which contributes 21 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), according to the National Institute Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

In Mexico there are 2.3 million people employed in paid domestic work, of which 9 out of 10 are women, according to the National Survey of Occupation and Employment, 2012.

Domestic workers represent 11.3 percent of all women participating in the labor market. Most of these deals in precarious conditions, low wages, no benefits, and in constant risk of abuse and humiliation, reported Bautista, also regional coordinator for Latin America at the International Federation of Domestic Workers (FITH).

An example of the deterioration of their working conditions, is that of the 2 million domestic workers, only 1.9 percent have a written contract.

More than half of the employees works five or six days a week, but their pay is "very low." A third of them (about 379 thousand) only receives a minimum wage, while 4 in 10 workers (about 849,000) received between one and two minimum wages. And only 3.7 percent of those involved in the wins over three minimum wage sector.

Similarly, a small proportion of workers get benefits, just 2 percent of domestic workers in Mexico have access to health care for their jobs, and less than 1 percent receive bonuses, vacation or other benefit.

Paid domestic work and unpaid "is feminized, so these women are those with the highest degree of vulnerability in the labor market" as the critical economic situation are pushed into accepting the pay and conditions of employer.

"Domestic work is isolated and virtually invisible, this facilitates the lack of protection for domestic workers," added the president of CACEH.

Convention 189

In this scenario, CACEH urged the federal government to fulfill the commitment to ratify Convention 189 and Recommendation 201 on Decent Work for Domestic Workers and ILO, as Mexico would thus guaranteeing the labor rights of this sector.

CACEH, has developed a training process, training, employment and legal advice to domestic workers, in order to know their rights and to defend themselves by requiring employers and the same state that complying with labor rights as : day legal work, vacation, severance, bonuses, contributions to the general health system in pension, health and occupational hazards, transportation aid, trade union and other rights to which such workers occurs; also to reject the workplace and sexual harassment that many of them are subjected.

The civil association performs "Put your gloves for the rights of domestic workers," which promote ratification of C189 international instruments, campaign is also aimed at and employers, with the aim of generating awareness about their obligations employers.


Medellin 33, col Roma Norte, Mexico
Tel 52 07 54 66
Cel 55 10 66 27 03
contacto@caceh.org.mx
@ untrabajodigno

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